Hannah Pempus
Hannah Pempus Marketing
 Many of the design decisions were derived from the needs of the synagogue for an inexpensive structure that would last for years to come and could hold large groups for gathering.

Sukkah Design-Build

As a part of a student team looking to do an impactful community based design-build project over the summer between our first and second years of graduate school, we took on the project of building a modular sukkah for the northwest Portland synagogue Havurah Shalom. The goal of the project was to create a structure that would fit into the courtyard of the synagogue and could be disassembled, stored, and rebuilt each year for the holiday Sukkot by the members of the congregation. 

The team, coming from many faiths, took time learning about the history and rules of construction for the sukkah and was excited when asked to join in celebrating the first day of Sukkot at Havurah.

 Many of the design decisions were derived from the needs of the synagogue for an inexpensive structure that would last for years to come and could hold large groups for gathering.

Many of the design decisions were derived from the needs of the synagogue for an inexpensive structure that would last for years to come and could hold large groups for gathering.

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 The structure was comprised of repurposed wood from the Rebuilding Center, which allowed us to remain under budget for the project. The other materials included burlap sewn over hemp rope and the many plants gathered by congregation members to be strung about in the overhead canopy and attached to the structure. Other design decisions came directly from the rules for the Jewish holiday regarding construction of the sukkah itself (i.e. the roof must be made from something that once grew in the earth but is no longer attached to the ground).

The structure was comprised of repurposed wood from the Rebuilding Center, which allowed us to remain under budget for the project. The other materials included burlap sewn over hemp rope and the many plants gathered by congregation members to be strung about in the overhead canopy and attached to the structure. Other design decisions came directly from the rules for the Jewish holiday regarding construction of the sukkah itself (i.e. the roof must be made from something that once grew in the earth but is no longer attached to the ground).

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Walking inside of this space when it was complete was a wonderful, aromatic experience.

Walking inside of this space when it was complete was a wonderful, aromatic experience.